Diane Atkinson and Jane Robinson – book festival

Diane Atkinson and Jane Robinson were at the Edinburgh International Book Festival chaired by Donna Moore with an introduction by Adele Patrick. Part of the Revolting Women theme. 19 Aug 2018.

Adele Patrick, curator of the Revolting Women theme, opens proceedings at the Edinburgh International Book Festival. She took the time to name and challenge: “In this wonderfully auspicious year, the centenary of the Representation of the People’s Act 1918, in which awareness of issues of privilege, power and inequalities are almost omnipresent across the media, with campaigns such as #nomore, here we can reflect on the feminist continuum and audit its progress.”

She passes on to Donna Moore, also from the Glasgow Women’s Library and making her debut as chair, who introduces Jane Robinson. With her ready smile and silver shoes, she sits next to Diane Atkinson, resplendent in suffrage colours; both experts in the history of the suffrage movement with a focus on telling the stories of the individual women involved.

Diane Atkinson 1 (2)

“You could hurl this at a Westminster window and it’ll do some damage!” said Moore, holding Atkinson’s weighty volume, Rise Up Women! The Remarkable Lives of the Suffragettes. Standing to speak and with no need of notes, the author came to life, showing us photos and hilarious postcards from the times. She regaled us with true-life accounts of the militants and merchandisers of the suffragette movement.

Starting, fittingly, with the Pankhursts (“so charismatic – feminine, fashionable and able to light up a room very quickly”), she chose to tell us about women from all walks of life, all over the UK who joined them, in upholding the slogan, ‘Deeds not Words’, which was adopted after hearing about the working conditions and poverty of so many of their sisters.

These were the women who hit the news with their challenging behaviour: Jessie Spinks, only 17 years old, who changed her name to Vera Wentworth to spare the family embarrassment, “ She stalked politicians, followed them to church and harangued them; jumped out of the bushes when they were playing golf to ask when they would give women the vote; scaled the walls, a bit like a silent film, to suddenly appear at Asquith’s private dinner.”

Robinson, whose Parrot Pie for Breakfast, An Anthology of Women Pioneers is being made into a TV series, has recently produced Hearts and Minds, The Untold Story of the Great Pilgrimage and How Women Won the Vote The book tells of the suffragists, “peeresses and millhands, stepping out” in 1913, “the last long summer before the war” to march to London. This did more than any other single activity to persuade Prime Minister Asquith that “yes, I suppose women are people after all.”

Jane Robinson

As advice to young, disheartened women (a question from the audience), Robinson advised, “…being with other like-minded women, putting one foot in front of the other” and Atkinson added, “Think of actions that will change things.”

Moore ended by asking each writer which banner they would have held: Robinson said Suffragist and Atkinson, Suffragette.

Also by Jane Robinson, Wayward Women: A Guide to Women Travellers review to follow!

Author: tamsing

I walk, explore, and love to give and teach Shiatsu. tamsinlgrainger@gmail.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s